Alumnae Spotlight

  • Adila Siddiqi Baig ’89 (April 2014)

    Adila Siddiqi Baig ’89, DDS
    General Dentistry

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?
    I had many fond memories at SPSG. Morning prayers were a great way to start the day. I enjoyed all the hymns we would sing. Senior year was probably my most memorable year. I was co-editor of the yearbook. It was a lot of hard work but a great experience. Many of my good friends were also in the yearbook club so I got to spend many long hours with them, picking out the layout and pictures. In the end, when yearbooks came out, it was very gratifying to present it to the school at morning assembly.

    2. How did your SPSG experience influence the person you are today?
    SPSG really prepared me for college. The small class size gave us a feeling of comfort and individual attention. SPSG teachers, coaches and counselors gave us a lot of help, support and guidance. They instilled in us the self-confidence needed to achieve success. They gave us the courage to dare, the knowledge to excel and the belief that we could succeed.

  • Caroline Arrabal ’08 (March 2014)

    Caroline Arrabal ’08
    ​Engineer, Loss Control Engineer at AIG

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?
    My fondest memory would be my last Class Day. It was our final chance to say goodbye to the school as a class. I love the traditions that are part of that day.

    2. How did your SPSG experience influence the person you are today?
    SPSG allowed me to explore my interests and be whoever I wanted. I felt encouraged to explore whatever interested me.

  • Wesley Michael ’04 (February 2014)

    Wesley Michael ’04
    Specialist, Division of Hematologic Oncology

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?
    I have so many amazing memories of St. Paul’s, but if I had to choose one it would be performing our senior skits in front of the school at the end of the year. Our class was full of characters so our skits were pretty outrageous. It was so fun and I remember looking around the gym and seeing so many students and faculty with tears in their eyes from laughing so hard. At our 5-year reunion, one of our classmates brought the video of our senior skits for us to watch and we laughed until we cried all over again.

    2. How did your SPSG experience influence the person you are today?
    At St. Paul’s we were encouraged to ask a lot of questions in and out of the classroom. At the time, I didn’t realize how important this was for my personal development, but in college I began to recognize that I was always the first girl in the classroom to raise her hand or volunteer to speak in front of the class.

  • Ciara Zachary '99 (January 2014)

    Ciara Zachary '99
    Senior Health Care Researcher, Econometrica, Inc.

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?
    I have great memories of St. Paul’s School for Girls before I was even admitted! I remember visiting SPSG as a fifth grader and meeting Mrs. Diana, the head of the middle school. Her smile and her hugs were so warm and welcoming that my mother and I knew that St. Paul’s was the right place for me. But if I must choose one, I guess it would have to be Ring Dance and the events leading up to it. As a sixth grader on, I felt such excitement as the Upper School girls received their rings and asked their fellow gators to turn their rings. When it finally became my turn, I was nervous and excited to see who would give me my ring and wondered how long it would take for me to get to 98 turns since tradition says the last turn is your Ring Dance date. I can now laugh at how long it took for my class to decide on our theme, but we definitely decorated the cafeteria with style. I have fond memories thinking back to one of the first times I got to see all of my classmates dressed up only later to kick off our heels and dance all night.

  • Holly Freedman '99 (December 2013)

    Holly Freedman '99
    Director, Emerging Markets Private Equity Association

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?
    I have so many great ones that it is hard to choose. Among the moments I will never forget are the Class of '99's intense games of "Mat Ball" in gym class, which we thought were so much fun and which the gym teachers thought were a bit too competitive and brutal so that we were actually prohibited from playing the game for a while; and then, only allowed to play again on a probationary basis. The funny thing is that as intensely competitive as we were in the do-or-die circumstances of this made-up game, we were in fact a very close group of girls that has remained surprisingly close and very non-competitive as we get older, and have remained each other's biggest cheerleaders. I love seeing my classmates wherever I travel and the instant connection you have running into any familiar face from SPSG. I also fondly remember the diversity of opportunities that characterize the SPSG experience from being able to play all sorts of sports to getting a part in the school play to being exposed to so many different subjects despite the small school size, and being able to do all this even if you weren't the best at it and never were going to be. I miss being able to dabble in a variety of things on a weekly basis and the encouragement to try something new. I rarely find people who seemed to have had the same diversity of opportunities in their middle and high school that SPSG provided.

  • Tracy Bacigalupo
 (November 2013)

    Tracy Bacigalupo

    Partner, Foley & Lardner LLP
    
Alumna and SPSG Trustee

    1. What is your fondest memory of St. Paul’s School for Girls?

    I have so many fond memories of SPSG. I loved prayers, listening to Mrs. Wagley's brief but meaningful remarks and singing hymns about "dogs with friendly faces", happily ensconced with our class in alphabetical order and with the faculty sitting at the end of the Assembly Room watching over us. I also have fond memories of playing field hockey in the Fall with the sweep of corn stalks that used to be in the field next to us, where the tennis courts are now. I always loved Mrs. Nekola’s English class, with her dramatic commentary and piercing (sometimes scary) questions, Madame Mattson’s absolutely charming French lessons and Mrs. Shoemaker teaching us vocabulary words, rolling out each syllable. And Mrs. Booze’s cuss box. I could go on.